A Meaningful Ceremony

Posted by on Sep 7, 2016 in Love, The Wedding Service, Venues | 0 comments

A Meaningful Ceremony

Dear Engaged Couples,

This weekend I officiated at a glorious wedding in Lexington, Virginia.  More about the venue in a moment, but I want to share with you, first, a meaningful ceremony that was part of a delightful couple’s marriage service.  It offered a poignant reminder of the what marriage is about—a commitment that lasts over years—indeed, a lifetime.

The couple had made an online purchase of a large hour glass with a removable top (see, for example, https://www.justhourglasses.com/pages/wedding-sand-ceremony-kits-you-assemble/). On their wedding day, before the service, the couple placed the hour glass, and two glass vases filled with colored sand (the groom’s sand was gray, the bride’s was pink) on a small table near where the marriage ceremony would take place.  Before the service, the hour glass was empty.  During the service, after the bride and groom exchanged vows and rings, they moved over to the table.  I explained to the couple’s wedding guests what would be happening next:

The hour glass plus the two containers. This picture was taken AFTER the service

The hour glass plus the two containers. This picture was taken AFTER the service

“Courtney and David wanted to include in this service an hour glass ceremony, which is new to me. The ceremony is a poignant reminder of the what marriage is about—commitment that lasts over years—indeed, a lifetime.  The sand that you pour into the hourglass, Courtney and David, represents the minutes, the hours, the days and yes, the years that are to come.  You pour your future into the hour glass that is your married relationship.  We are reminded too, that you have to flip the hour glass from time to time—so will your married relationship be in flux—as you face new challenges, visit new places, come in contact with new people, experience new joys that come with living a full and gracious life together.”

Courtney and David did indeed pour the sand into the glass.  She poured some, he poured some, she poured some more and then he poured some more.  The sand made an artistic wavy pattern. Then the couple closed the lid of the hour glass, and returned to their places, between me (the officiant) and their guests.  I closed the service with a final blessing and the expected, “I now pronounce you husband and wife.  David you may kiss the bride!”

The Venue: House Mountain Inn

The Venue: House Mountain Inn

As I said, the hour glass was a meaningful ceremony, and certainly made for a welcome addition to the whole. I am confident that the couple’s guests will remember it for a long time to come.  And of course, the couple has another visual reminder (along with their wedding rings)  of their commitment to one another.

Now, as I promised, I share with you here the other details of the wedding.  It was held at the House Mountain Inn, in Lexington.  The couple and many of their guests actually rented rooms at the Inn.  It made for a sweet get-away retreat for the couple and their closest and dearest.

If you are looking for a meaningful ceremony for YOUR wedding service, you might consider an hour glass.

Happy Wedding Planning!

Yours,  Gay Lee

 

 

 

 

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